Writing a Resolution

A resolution is a document written by delegates before the conference. This document forms the basis for debate. The goal of a resolution is to create a list of things that should be accomplished in order to solve a problem. Changes (amendments) like adding clauses, taking clauses away and modifying clauses will be made by delegates during lobbying and then during the debate. Finally, resolutions are voted on and either pass or fail.

Stage 1 – Planning

A resolution is a document with a very specific format. The best way to plan your resolution is divide a page into two sections. One should be for “Basic Knowledge” and the other “Action to be Taken”.

In the “Basic Knowledge” section, write down all the information that might help delegates understand the issue. This may include definitions, dates, names of documents, certain facts.

In the “Action to be Taken” section, write down all the things that should be done to help improve the issue.

Stage 2 – Preambulatory Clauses

Now the information in the “Basic Knowledge” section can be transformed into the first section of a resolution called the Preambulatory Clauses. A clause is simply a statement that is part of a sentence. The preambulatory clauses of the resolution are separated by commas. This part of the resolution focuses on getting people up to date with your issue. It is a section composed of facts; not action or opinions. The clauses should start with preambulatory phrases, which are always italicized. An interesting fact about resolutions is that they don’t have any periods (full stops), except for one at the very end. Examples of preamublatory phrases are:

Affirming
Alarmed by
Approving
Aware of
Bearing in mind
Believing
Confident
Convinced
Declaring
Deeply concerned
Deeply conscious
Deeply convinced
Deeply disturbed
Desiring
Emphasizing
Expecting
Expressing its appreciation
Expressing its satisfaction
Fulfilling
Fully alarmed
Fully aware
Fully believing
Further deploring
Further recalling
Guided by
Having adopted
Having considered
Having considered further
Having devoted
Having examined
Having heard
Having received
Having studied
Keeping in mind
Noting with deep concern
Noting with approval
Noting further
Noting with regret
Noting with satisfaction
Observing
Reaffirming
Realizing
Recalling
Recognizing
Referring
Seeking
Taking into account
Taking into consideration
Taking notes
Welcoming

Stage 3 – Operative Clauses

The “Action to be Taken” ideas are the most important part of the resolution. The ideas are used to write operative clauses. The operative clauses are what you think should happen to solve the issue. They suggest actions and solutions to the issue given. Operative clauses are not sentences, and are seperated with semicolons. Operative clauses are preceeded by a number and begin with operative phrases, that are always underlined. See sample resolution. Examples of operative phrases are:

Accepts
Affirms
Approves
Authorizes
Calls
Calls upon
Condemns
Confirms
Congratulates
Considers
Declares accordingly
Deplores
Designates
Draws the attention
Emphasizes
Encourages
Endorses
Express its appreciation
Express its hope
Further invites
Further proclaims
Further reminds
Further recommends
Further request
Further resolve
Has resolved
Notes
Proclaims
Reaffirms
Recommends
Regrets
Reminds
Request
Solemnly Affirms
Strongly condemns
Supports
Takes note of
Transmit
Trust
Urges